Monthly Archives: August 2020

Live without regret

It is possible, if we make the right choices now, to finish life with peace of mind and without regrets. It will take loads of courage. Bronnie Ware, a writer and songwriter, also spent several years as a palliative nurse caring for those dying in their homes. From beside their deathbeds she listened to their stories, to their hearts and to their truth. She also listened to their regrets. She wrote: My patients were those who had gone home to die. Some incredibly special times were shared. I was with them for the last 3 to 12 weeks of their lives. People grow a lot when they are faced with their own mortality. I learnt never to underestimate someone’s capacity for growth. Some changes were phenomenal. Each experienced a variety of emotions, as expected, denial, fear, anger, remorse, more denial and eventually acceptance. She compiled all of her discoveries into an article called The Top Five Regrets of the Dying, which gained so much momentum that it was read by more than three million people around the globe in its first year. She developed an understanding that we can learn from those nearing death and apply this knowledge as a gift in…

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Maintain success momentum

In business, we receive incentives, rewards and recognition to show appreciation for good work. But just in case your boss doesn’t work that way, or you work for yourself, you can still reward yourself for a job well done. So why don’t we take the time to stop and reward and congratulate ourselves? Perhaps we: don’t see the importance of taking time to celebrate our success don’t want to take out the time in case we lose momentum are waiting for someone else to reward us are a quiet achiever — conscious of the ‘tall poppy syndrome’. I brought a brass gong into my office, and whenever we achieved a result we would strike the gong to celebrate — loudly! It was interesting to note that the winners (and the winners in the making) would congratulate their teammates who got a result but the poor performers would remain silent. Once I noticed this, I highlighted that it showed good character to congratulate others for good results. A good culture celebrates success and good leadership promotes this. If you are playing a solo game, do you still take the time to reward yourself — regardless of whether you have supportive people…

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Hold the belief

Sometimes we think we have lost our mojo, but all we may need is to get some support and work alongside people with similar values and vision, and who are, best of all, people we like. And like a relay race it becomes a combined effort, creating many benefits for all. The story of Helen Keller is well known — a woman who at the age of 19 months became deaf and blind. But it’s the story of her teacher, Anne Sullivan that is truly remarkable. At the age of 21 Anne Sullivan began tutoring six-year-old Helen Keller. Helen was left deaf, blind and mute from a childhood illness. Anne Sullivan was frustrated, having no way to communicate with Helen Keller, whose behaviour was wild and totally out of control — some said “animal like”. Anne had a vision and a belief that she could help Helen, even though it took great persistence managing Helen’s many wild tantrums. Anne herself had had nine operations to help her own failing eyesight prior to working with Helen. She knew how important her own sight was and had compassion for the young child many wanted to put into an asylum. Anne showed courage and much belief, conviction and…

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Clever people

When we are super-focused on a result, sometimes it’s easy to work the fun out it. A smart way to create the life you want is to find the fun in the journey. Beyond a serious and sober existence lies a playground of possibility. Remember those pre-school days — with play time, eat time and sleep time? Your learning and development was done through play. Fast forward — is play time still there or a distant memory? Do weeks pass by with no play, fun or laughter? Faced with a choice between a fun road or humdrum road, which would you choose? Do you value fun as a way to high achievement and fulfilment? I value fun and wasn’t surprised when a values inventory given by The Corporate Anthropologist and Thought Leader Michael Henderson, identified some of my top values as: Simplicity/Play: To see simplicity in complexity and take a playful attitude towards organisations and systems that are energising and positive. Fantasy/Play: To enrich personal worth through fantasy and play. Seek fun and playfulness over dull routines. Clever people know to: Work SMART Rest SMART Play SMART! Sure, we can reach high achievement but without finding the fun, fulfilment may always escape you. Find the fun in what you do and…

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